Banner
Home
Search
Home Treatment Supplements
Complementary & Mainstream Treatment Approaches - Questions & Answers PDF Print E-mail
Article Index
Complementary & Mainstream Treatment Approaches
Symptoms & Diagnosis
Why do we get sick?
Diagnostic tests
Nutrition
Allergy Approaches
Treatment Approaches
Importance of Support
Questions & Answers
All Pages
(Q) Do you have to do all these tests?
(A) You can triage your need for certain tests based on your health history if necessary. Unfortunately, many of these tests are not covered by insurance.

(Q) Do you see any consistency in test results?
(A) Unfortunately she sees no consistency, the patients are very heterogeneous (varied).

(Q) What about the use of hormone replacement if you are on heparin?
(A) Dr. Hubbuch sees no contraindications.

(Q) What about getting the flu shot?
(A) Dr. Hubbuch had two answers. If you have had a flu shot with little to no reaction, you can continue to do so. She has also seen some patients who have relapsed after their first flu shot, so she does not recommend it to patients who have not had it yet.

(Q) Even though I have lots of allergic reactions to pollens, food and drugs, my allergy tests are negative. Why?
(A) There are many different mechanisms of intolerance. It may not be antibody related. It may be related to immune complexes/ other. Avoid the substances whenever possible. The goal of any intervention is to switch from TH-2 to TH-1. This can be done with acupuncture, NAET desensitization (chiropractic) and other methods.[It is highly doubtful the methods suggested will switch the immune system from TH-2 to TH-1.]

(Q) If a patient has a yeast/ bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine, what course of action would you take?
(A) You can rebalance the intestines with probiotics i.e. lactobacillus bifidus, lactobacillus GG to return the good bacteria. You can use glutamine (supports repairs of leaky gut), fish peptides and inulin. Antifungal approaches include: grapefruit seed extract, oregano oil and nystatin (medication for treatment of yeast).

(Q) Can any of the following reduce or eliminate bad intestinal bugs without harming good bugs?
(Q) Hot or cold liquids?
(A) She does not recommend it.

(Q) Deliberate diarrhea?
(A) She does not recommend it.

(Q) No sugar or starch?
(A) She does recommend this, it will decrease symptoms because you are not feeding the yeast.

(Q) Fasting?
(A) Fasting is difficult for people who are ill. She does not recommend it. If you want to detoxify, try a simple rice, vegetable, olive oil diet, or you can use a prepared rice-based drink i.e. ultraclear.

(Q) Do you recommend diflucan for chronic yeast overgrowth?
(A) Yes, it is a very useful medication for chronic systemic yeast problems, and it has few side-effects.

(Q) Should I have my silver fillings removed?
(A) If you have high mercury toxicity and all other approaches have failed then yes. It is very expensive and can trigger more complications and there is no guarantee it will work.

(Q) Do you know of any credible negative connection between root canals and FM?
(A) We are learning more and more about the interconnection of your teeth and your overall health through the biological dentistry movement. Your teeth sit on key meridian points in your body. Root canals are a potential source of chronic infection. Even though the main roots are removed, there are miles of roots that remain. The biggest problem is there are no good alternatives to root canals at this point.

(Q) I eat a lot of salmon and tuna, do I need to be checked for mercury? If so, how often?
(A) You should be checked about once a year. To keep your levels low, you can eat enough minerals to rebalance yourself, i.e., magnesium, calcium, zinc, garlic, etc.

(Q) Are there any growth hormone (GH) precursors that really work?
(A) Not many are effective. She does not do much work with GH but other M.D.s who do have recommended Trans- D tropin available through College Pharmacy.

(Q) Can you have absorption problems with supplements in pill form?
(A) You need to check the stool for evidence of undigested pills and malabsorption. If so, then you may need to go to a liquid form.

(Q) What about the use of IV lidocaine for pain?
(A) She has not found it to be very helpful.

(Q) Is gamma globulin safe to use since it is a blood product?
(A) It's safe.

(Q) I've heard of a test for the pituitary. Is it useful?
(A) You're likely referring to the ACTH stimulation test which checks cortisone reserves. What may prove more useful is a 24 hr. urine test for hormones that measures thyroid, adrenal and GH. There is also a saliva test that looks at levels four times in a day. This will show natural diurnal variations within the day.

(Q) Can lead poisoning as a child trigger symptoms as an adult?
(A) Yes, you should be retested for lead. The acceptable levels have lowered in the last 20 years, so there may still be some residual lead.

(Q) Is there a link between CFIDS, depression and bipolar disorder?
(A) There is no link with bipolar disorder, and she does not see much primary depression. Some of her patients have a reactive depression secondary to a chronic illness.

(Q) How effective are epsom salts in raising magnesium?
(A) Magnesium is well absorbed through the skin.

(Q) I use the hot tub daily absorbing bromine, and the swimming pool absorbing chlorine. Is this unhealthy?
(A} If you are able to tolerate it, then it is not a problem. If you have MCS, you may not tolerate it. An alternative is to look for pools and hot tubs sanitized with ozone or ultra violet light.

(Q) What has been your experience with the use of guaifenesin for the treatment of FM?
(A) I have not had a lot of success with this medication (found in many cough treatments). She has followed Dr. St. Amand's protocol.

(Q) Are your patients recovering?
(A) Many are improving, and some are recovering. Generally it is a slow road to improvement and recovery, and there are no simple answers. My goal is to improve my patient's quality of life to whatever degree is possible.

Editor's Note: Some of these treatments are new and have not been tested extensively, so you should consult with your health care provider before you start using them. Keep in mind that many alternative treatments are not covered by insurance, so costs are a factor you need to consider.



 
parkinDESIGN logo